Looking Back

The online CIHS Archives have more than 12,000 digitally archived items, including:  family letters, newspaper articles, photographs, postcards, and audio recordings.

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  • "Black Bart" Holzhey Cottage

    Cottage originally built by the notorious, Captiva loner "Black Bart" Holzhey in the 40's. In the photo it is Mary Cunningham's Island Gift Shop, situated where Chadwick Square is now, and where it remained until reportedly moved to the north-east corner of Wiles and Captiva Drive. 

  • Sanibel-Captiva Trolley

    Reportedly prompted by the gas shortages of the 70s, the Trolley began in 1981 as an island mass transportation system,  eventually transitioning to guided tours. It was operated by Betty & Jim Anholt for approximately 15 years, blending their interest and pursuit of island history, archeology, ecology and lore.

  • Employee Housing at 'Tween Waters Inn

    Employee housing at 'Tween Waters Inn (c 1990), the employees were known to call their accommodations "The Purple Penthouse."

  • Cleon and Ray Singleton

    The Singletons were owners/operators of the mailboat Santiva from 1936-1952.  The captain was fined 3-days pay if the boat was late. In all its years the “Santiva” missed just a handful of trips due to hurricanes.

  • First 'Tween Waters Cottage

    Miss Fitzpatrick was the tutor for the Dickey children. Her cottage became the original building that started 'Tween Waters Inn in 1931 by Bowman and Grace Price.

  • Bowman and Dorothy "Dottie" Price

    In 1924, Bowman and Grace Price purchased property on Captiva from John R. Dickey. This property included a small cottage belonging to the Dickey children’s tutor, Reba Fitzpatrick. Then they built a cottage towards the Gulf to be just a little guest cottage for family and friends. Originally known as “Price’s Cottages,” it took the name ‘Tween Waters Inn at the suggestion of conservationist/cartoonist J.N. “Ding” Darling who, along with his wife Penny, first stayed at the inn in March 1936.

Bridging the Past and the Present